GPS Tracking

Making a positive impact on communities

The specific needs, considerations, and sensitivities of criminal justice agencies using electronic monitoring to supervise people in the community are the focal point of our operations.

Where Does It Fit?


Work Release

Attenti’s solutions allow qualified offenders to leave confinement and maintain employment encouraging a successful transition into society.

Furlough Release

Attenti’s solutions allow qualified offenders to be granted a temporary release from incarceration for family, medical, and other purposes.

Pre-trial / Bail

Pre-trial detainees make up a large proportion of people in prisons worldwide. Community-based monitoring solutions reduce the load on prison services for incarcerated individuals awaiting trial and on remand, who have not yet been sentenced and may not be found guilty.

Short Sentences

Even short sentences can have long-term implications for offenders and their families. Alternatives to incarceration, such as community-based monitoring, help offenders serve their sentences while maintaining family support, paying restitution to their victims and contributing to society, both directly and indirectly.

Early Release

Our community-based monitoring systems enable offenders to serve the last portion of their sentence outside prison walls. Enforcement of pre-defined schedules helps offenders to modify behavior and facilitate rehabilitation into society.

Post-Release

Keeping communities safe and secure sometimes requires high-risk offenders, such as sex offenders and others, to be under on-going supervision with electronic monitoring once their prison terms have been completed and they are reintegrated back into society.

Immigration Control

National security, immigration, and border control agencies face multiple immigration control challenges. Electronic monitoring of illegal immigrants not only offers a cost-saving alternative to secure detention, but it also aims to improve appearance rates for interviews and compliance with immigration judicial orders.

Preventive Detention

Current geo-political events have increased the challenges of governments trying to protect citizens from the threat of terrorism. Electronic monitoring provides an alternative solution to preventative detention for tracking hostile individuals, such as suspected terrorists.

Products

One-Piece GPS

Attenti’s self-contained One-Piece GPS Tracking Device is designed to continuously monitor the offender's location at varying levels of intensity.

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Two-Piece GPS

Attenti’s Two-Piece GPS Offender Tracking Unit provides precision location tracking for continuous offender monitoring.

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Software

aware.

aware., the Offender Management System (OMS), is the heart of Attenti’s monitoring solution. The OMS enables management of all system entities including probation officers, monitoring center staff, the people monitored by the system, equipment inventory and events generated by devices in the field. Data received from numerous field units is processed, stored and displayed to provide users with diverse roles together with the information they need to run a successful monitoring program.

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aware.mobile

aware.mobile is a real-time electronic monitoring application with an intuitive and friendly interface that empowers officers in the field to effectively manage their workload from a mobile device both seamlessly and securely. The app enhances productivity and enables officers to remotely monitor their offenders, with a powerful set of advanced capabilities. aware.mobile runs on mobile devices running Android™ operating systems (iOS support to follow shortly).

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Customer-Focused Services

Training and Implementation

Attenti's training is effective, streamlined, interactive, and successful. Tailored to meet the needs of the agency, our training options include onsite, webinar, and video. Our comprehensive and efficient implementation plans are based on extensive experience and best practices.

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